4 Easy, Effective Ways to Tie a Fishing Knot

Did you know there’s over 100 types of fishing knots? Pretty amazing, huh? The type of fishing knot you should use depends on several different factors such as the type of fish you’re fishing for, the type of fishing rod you’re using, the type of line you have, and much more.

From the Palomar knot to the Surgeon’s Loop to the Trilene knot, we’ll teach you how to tie the top 4 most popular and unique fishing knots out there.

1. The Palomar Knot

The Palomar knot could easily be classified as the most popular and strongest fishing knots used by both professional and amateur fishermen. It is primarily used among the bass fisherman community, but can be used for catching any type of fish.

Follow the steps below:

1. With about a foot of line, double it and pass it through the eye of the hook, lure or swivel
2. In the doubled line, tie an overhand knot
3. Pull the end of down and pass it entirely over the hook
4. Pull both ends of the line tight to make the knot
5. Clip off any excess line

Tip: Moisten the line to help you get it tighter.

2. The Fisherman’s Knot

The Fisherman’s knot is another popular knot used among the fishing community. It’s known by several different names including waterman’s knot, halibut knot, angler’s knot and English knot. It’s a pretty simple knot to master and can be used in any type of situation a knot calls for such as knitting.

Follow the steps below:

1. Taking the tag end (end of your line), run anywhere from 8 to 12 inches of line through the eye of the hook
2. Wrap the end of the line five times around the standing end (the rest of the line)
3. Take the tag end through the loop, which is next to the hook eye (you should have two loops now)
4. Pass the tag end through the loop
5. While holding both the tag end and standing end in one hand, bend the hook and pull tightly
6. Clip off any excess line

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Tip: Moistening the line may help tighten the line.

3. The Surgeon’s Knot

If you’re looking for a pretty easy and effective knot, the surgeon’s knot may be the answer for you. This knot is a variation of what’s known as a “reef knot”, mimicking its exact formation, with the addition of an extra twist when tying the first throw. The extra twist gives the knot more stability and makes it much more effective when using it for things such as fishing.

The most common type of fishing this knot is used for is fly fishing. This is due to needing a much more reliable knot when fishing in bodies of water that are known to be faster flowing.

Follow the steps below:

1. Using two lines (one tag end and one leader), lay one over the other with a couple inches of line on each side
2. Form a loop
3. Pass both ends through the loop until you have 4 ends
4. Pull tightly to tighten

Tip: Like the other two knots we’ve covered in this article, moistening the lines may help you get a tighter knot.

4. The Snell Knot

This knot is one of the oldest knots known to mankind. It’s been used for centuries and has been modified many times. In this article, we’ll teach you how to tie the traditional version to help you get down the basics. What’s cool about this knot compared to other fishing knots, is you can tie it directly to the bait.

Follow the steps below:

1. Below the hook, form a loop by inserting the end leader into the hook eye and the other end line away from the hook
2. Using one hand, hold the hook and line with your thumb and pointer finger
3. Using the other hand, wrap the line around the hook and line seven or eight times
4. Still holding the hook and now turned line pull the end of the leader through the eye of the hook
5. Once the knot is almost tight, slide it towards the eye and pull the leader line tightly to form your knot

Have you ever been lost in the fishing and found yourself stuck with a huge question? Want a pro answer? Share your experience with us in the comments section below!


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CONTRIBUTORS

Brent is a Sponsored Bass Angler from Murfreesboro, TN, where he is enjoying the single life of a tournament fisherman.

Brent is a Sponsored Bass Angler from Murfreesboro, TN, where he is enjoying the single life of a tournament fisherman.

Travis is a lifelong fishing enthusiast from the Gulf Coast of Texas. He specializes in salt water and coastal fishing.

Travis is a lifelong fishing enthusiast from the Gulf Coast of Texas. He specializes in salt water and coastal fishing.

Chef Bobby is a Chef and Cookbook Author. He loves to share his knowledge of cooking and handling of fish with our community.

Chef Bobby is a Chef and Cookbook Author. He loves to share his knowledge of cooking and handling of fish with our community.

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